Photography: African hair styles – in pictures

OJ ’Ohkai Ojeikere photography

Oluweri headdress, 1972
‘There are hundreds of ethnic groups in Nigeria, each with its own language, traditions and as many different hairstyles,’ Ojeikere once said in an interview. ‘The hairstyles are never exactly the same; each one has its own beauty’
Photograph: JD ’Ohkai Ojeikere/Gallery Fifty One, Antwerp

Hello, Guys,  How was the week? I hope Splendid.

So, i came across a short but informative and uniquely inspiring article about African Hair styles and i just wanted to share it with you all. In the light of deciding what is beautiful, i think the most important thing is for one to stay true to self, remember who they are and be proud of what they are. And staying true to oneself requires the hard task of self acceptance and contentment. Be you, decide what is BEAUTIFUL to you and embody it. LIVE YOU!!!

The slideshow showcased 10 pictures which if i am not mistaken were taken by JD ‘Okhai Ojeikere who died at 83years old. Sometime last week. The man had an extensive compilation of work and photographs starting from 1960’s which is now roughly about 1,000 different pictures of numerous African Hairstyles.

 ‘All these hairstyles are ephemeral. I want my photographs to be noteworthy traces of them,’ Ojeikere once said
OJ ’Ohkai Ojeikere photography
Traditional Ceremonial Suku, 1974
‘To watch a hair artist going through his precise gestures, like an artist making a sculpture, is fascinating. Hairstyles are an art form’
Photograph: JD ’Ohkai Ojeikere/Gallery Fifty One, Antwerp OJ ’Ohkai Ojeikere photography
Shangalti, 1971
‘Royal families have the exclusive right to their hairstyle, which cannot be imitated… it’s a mark of distinction. Their knowledge is transmitted from mother to daughter’
Photograph: JD ’Ohkai Ojeikere/Gallery Fifty One, Antwerp

OJ ’Ohkai Ojeikere photographyCoiling Penny Penny, 1974
‘Some styles sometimes need more than a week of work’

Photograph: JD ’Ohkai Ojeikere/Gallery Fifty One, Antwerp
OJ ’Ohkai Ojeikere photographyPineapple, 1969
Photograph: JD ’Ohkai Ojeikere/Gallery Fifty One, AntwerpOJ ’Ohkai Ojeikere photographySuku sinero/Kiko, 1974
Photograph: JD ’Ohkai Ojeikere/Gallery Fifty One, AntwerpOJ ’Ohkai Ojeikere photographyAtaiai, 1970
Photograph: JD ’Ohkai Ojeikere/Gallery Fifty One, AntwerpOJ ’Ohkai Ojeikere photographyModern Suku, 1975
Photograph: JD ’Ohkai Ojeikere/Gallery Fifty One, Antwerp `OJ ’Ohkai Ojeikere photographyOnile Gogoro / Akaba, 1975
Photograph: JD ’Ohkai Ojeikere/Gallery Fifty One, Antwerp
Eitne Uton Eku, 1971
Photograph: JD ’Ohkai Ojeikere/Gallery Fifty One, Antwerp
The Original Article was written by Corinne Jones for THE GUARDIAN
 Finally, I think the African Hair Style has evolved and changed so much it is also worth writing about; so i will do my research and show you all the possible evolution of African Hairstyles
Its Friday, I know everyone is ecstatic, I didn’t do a valentine’s day post because i wanted to do something different and unique and it isn’t like the web is in lack of valentine’s days look ideas

But on that Note i still want to wish everyone—

 A Happy Valentines Day

XoXo

Chioma

3 Comments Add yours

  1. dapperdolly says:

    Exquisitely interesting post, I think I like the ‘Suku sinero/Kiko, 1974’ pic best but they are superb in general. The post reminds me of one I wrote a while back referring to the origin of Medusa and how it was twisted/corrupted over time, the original image being of an African goddess later demonized by the invading/conquering empires. It was just a general piece and showed her connection to the Earth Mother theme and the Goddess Kali/Kalimata. I love the creativity here.

  2. Mariam says:

    Really interesting post. I used to wear a significantly toned down version of the modern suku as a child. It’s weird to think how long these styles have been around.

    http://www.amu-dat.com

    1. Hahah me too, there are so many hairstyles like that, it was so fun to look through his work

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